Tuesday, December 11, 2007

To Design or Code?

"The one who does the work decides." -- KDE principle
Jeff Atwood over at the Coding Horror blog discusses a fascinating problem in software development. Doers and talkers. Designers and coders.

I believe all developers need to have a bit of both in their toolbox. Mainly, because the first design is most always changed due to scope creep (failure to see all the pieces to the puzzle). If you spend all your time talking about that first design...you never get to coding. And if you can't get to the coding...you'll fail to find those missing puzzle pieces. And fail to deliver a prototype for the customers to evaluate.

Designers, this means getting your hands dirty in order to create something to improve. Developing systems is an iterative process. Design, code, design, code. And yes, even code, design, code, design. The ultimate goal is to refine the process until you and your customers are satisfied. Whatever it takes. And yes, that means moving to the coding stage even when the optimal design has yet to reveal itself. It's really a Kaizen process. Small accomplished improvements to the initial design pays dividends to all.

Coders, this means before plunging forward hacking away at the problem...ask for feedback of your idea and possible alternatives to the problem. It's important to starting coding down the right path. One that encompasses as much information of the problem as possible. This means you'll need to bring some information to the design table yourself. Perhaps a bit of discovery coding must take place to figure out what elements are involved and possible problems or bottlenecks in your proposed solution. This also helps in keeping the design discussion focused.

So, how does this apply to investing? Well, how many investors/traders do you know that invest without a plan? Without a design? An overriding investment philosophy? Just plunge ahead into the market?

These type of investors would be well served by stepping back a bit and design their investment model. Then ask for feedback of their proposed design. It's okay to perform some discovery trading first. Determining how the market handles your ideas. But, gather what you need and then design. Then invest with the goal of continually refining your design.

What about investors/traders who are afraid of the market? Have not found an investment model that is perfect? And refuse to step a toe in the market waters until they feel 100% comfortable in their design? Problem with this thinking is knowledge requires experience. And nothing is ever 100%...especially in the market. So, create your investment manifesto and then try it out. You can't improve upon something that isn't there to improve. And you can't design a successful investment strategy if you don't have market experience.

Later trades,


No comments: